How Much Was That?

HI Claudia! How are you?

Thought I would share this book-related experience with you.

Over the many winters that we have spent in AZ, John and I have enjoyed dining at a little family-owned café in Mesa called Mangos. They serve wonderful Mexican food and also have their own homemade fruit drinks called Agua Fresca. For these drinks they use cantaloupe, watermelon, mangos, lemons, limes — whatever is in season. The fruit flavor is incredible! It’s as though you have put a straw into a freshly opened watermelon or pineapple and sipped up pure nectar. Bliss!

Right next door to Mangos is a  second-hand book store called Book Gallery. I have wanted to visit this store for a long time. Last week we made an unscheduled visit to Mangos and there was time to go into the Book Gallery at last. It resembles a lot of other wonderful old bookstores: Floor-to-ceiling shelves, numerous tables, and carts, and glass cases brimming over with bookish items. The possibility of finding hidden or misplaced treasures lures me into these venerable places.

I had a question so I looked around for help and spotted a proprietor-type person seated in a low chair behind the front, book-laden counter. This being the Southwest, I asked the young man if they carried anything by Wallace Stegner. He asked what I had in mind, and I said,

 “A first-edition of Angle of Repose.” 

He stopped for a moment to study me. Then he said,

“I don’t have one here, but there is one at our other store in Phoenix on Indian School Road. I am afraid it is rather pricey,” he apologized.

 “What do you mean by pricey?” I asked.

 “A first edition, unsigned, is $1,000.00.”

“Oh,” I gulped and hoped the alarm in my voice wasn’t detectable. 

“Come this way,” he said as he walked toward the area of the store that housed their Fiction collection.

I followed the salesperson up a wide set of old, worn wooden stairs and we maneuvered around neat stacks of books to a well-lit corner on the second floor. I saw a small, white, rectangle of paper attached to a shelf. It had an “S” on it written with a Magic Marker.

The knowledgeable bookseller showed me their assortment of Stegner’s works in hardback, paperback, as well as various editions of his many books. None of them cost anywhere close to a thousand dollars, thank goodness. I bought three, all paperbacks: Crossing to Safety ($7), The Sound of Mountain Water ($4), and Wolf Willow ($4)

I had not read The Sound of Mountain Water or Wolf Willow, so I began Wolf Willow (full title, Wolf Willow: A History, A Story, and A Memory of the Last Plains Frontier) last night and was reminded again why Stegner is such a celebrated writer. Here are two paragraphs toward the end of the first chapter of the First Part of Wolf Willow entitled “The Question Mark in the Circle.” In this chapter, Stegner returns to Whitemud, Saskatchewan, just across the Montana border, in search of his boyhood identity. He has sought out the countryside, the river, the town, even his childhood house, but the essence of “home” and “self” eludes him. Then this:


“I pick up a handful of mud and sniff it. I step over the little girls and bend my nose to the wet rail of the bridge. I stand above the water and sniff. On the other side, I strip leaves off wild rose and dogwood. Nothing doing. And yet all around me is that odor that I have not smelled since I was eleven, but have never forgotten — have dreamed, more than once. Then I pull myself up the bank by a gray-leafed bush, and I have it. That tantalizing and ambiguous and wholly native smell is no more than the shrub we called wolf willow, now blooming with small yellow flowers.

It is wolf willow, and not the town or anyone in it, that brings me home. For a few minutes, with a handful of leaves to my nose, I look across at the clay bank and the hills beyond where the river loops back on itself, enclosing the old sports and picnic ground, and the present and all the years between are shed like a boy’s clothes dumped on the bath-house bench. The perspective is what it used to be, the dimensions are restored, the senses are as clear as if they had not been battered with sensations for forty alien years. And the queer adult compulsion to return to one’s beginnings is assuaged. A contact has been made, a mystery touched. For the moment, reality is made exactly equivalent with memory, and a hunger is satisfied. The sensuous little savage that I once was is still intact inside me.”  (p19, Ballantine Books, Comstock Edition, 1973)

Wow. Such skill! He has achieved in those two paragraphs what any memoirist would hope to capture in their writing, I think, and that is: “… reality is made exactly equivalent with memory, and a hunger is satisfied.”

Did I tell you we are in the process of buying a small house here in Apache Junction? I guess this means we will have more opportunities to enjoy Mangos and Gallery Books. We hope to be home to Zimmerman sometime in early May. 

I look forward to seeing you soon!

Much love 

Teri

7 thoughts on “How Much Was That?

  1. “For the moment, reality is made exactly equivalent with memory, and a hunger is satisfied.” That’s a great sentence. I’ll have to borrow some of your “Stegner’s” : )

  2. I enjoyed Stegner’s “Angle of Repose” – at your suggestion a couple years back. Thanks and thanks again!

  3. Hello Teri~~just a short note to let you know how much I enjoy reading your blog. I was a classmate of yours at Holy Angels. I actually got married at St. John’s church. I especially enjoyed your posts about Mrs. Waggoner and Mary Johnson. So fun looking back on those bygone days.
    Take Care!

    • HI Theresa! Thank you for reading the blog and taking the time to leave a message. Do you have a blog as well? I would love to read it if you do.
      Do you live in Seattle or the surrounding area yet? I know the Seattle of our youth is not the one that exists now, but
      I included it in a book that I wrote for one of my granddaughters. Holy Angels is in the book, too, although it has been updated a bit. The story about Mrs. Wagoner found a place in one of the chapters. And I still wish I could locate Mary Johnson!
      Thank you for your kind comments, Theresa.
      Best Wishes,
      Teri

  4. Hi again Teri, I live 20 mins. from Seattle & am currently visiting with my sister in Mesa, AZ. How is that for coincidence. She said they have eaten at Mangos many times! ~~Theresa

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